Don't Wait. Call For Free Consultation

(951) 222-2228

Making Memories during Parenting Time

Raising Children after Divorce As an adult, I can look back to my childhood and the fond memories of growing up.  Memories of playing baseball in the front yard, the road trip to the Grand Canyon and Lake Powell, and playing in the tree house in the back yard. Raising children, post divorce, generates a need to create new memories for your children, as they grow up in a whole new world.  Your children have been through a whirlwind and creating new special memories will help.  Help create new memories for your children during your parenting time, and encourage your co-parent to do the same. Short weekend getaways, or even day trips, can create lasting memories.  A trip to the beach or the zoo will stick in the minds of your children for years.  A special stop at a road side restaurant or a “local” favorite will trigger stories from your children in the future. If you are limited on time and funds, make a memory in the kitchen and have the children help with a special dinner or let them make a dessert (on their own, if they are age appropriate).  The lifelong memory of making the dessert mess will certainly outweigh the extra ten minutes of cleaning.  Add in a movie night and sit patiently when your child picks a movie you have seen over and over.  Your child will cherish the memory and remember your time together. You want your child to remember the fun times you have together, so it is important to create those moments for them – magic does not happen by chance. ...

Co-Parenting for Children’s Sake

Co Parenting & Raising Children All Together Separate If you are in conflict with your child’s other parent, your child is in danger, and only you can protect them.  Focusing on your child’s needs not only benefits them, but helps do what is best for you. Co-parenting harmoniously with your co-parent provides your child with a safe environment to grow up and create close relationships with both parents, but it is easier said than done.  Regardless of the initial feelings and challenges, treat your co-parent with the same amount of respect that you show the 7-11 clerk or the gas station attendant and you will find the bitterness and frustration fade away. Child visitation exchanges are sometimes the most difficult with the ex; interaction with each other at drop-offs or speaking to each other to discuss issues often seems like Mission Impossible.  Handle your exchanges similar to a pizza delivery; meet, take delivery of your child, walk away.  When taking your pizza, you seldom ask about the origin of the toppings, who made them, where they were stored prior to use, how they were applied, or whether there are enough.  Likewise, don’t grill the other parent about your child at exchanges; take your child and go.  Leave discussions for other times – when your child is not standing there, too. Recognize that the relationship you now have with your co-parent is a “new” relationship and completely different from the one you had prior.  This new relationship is all about taking care of your child, identifying the best interest of your child in the child custody and child visitation decisions,...