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How can I communicate with my children when I don’t have custody?

How can I communicate with my children when I don’t have custody?

Parenting is one of the hardest jobs you can do. However, that job can get even harder after a divorce. The divorce process is very stressful, and could possibly strain your relationships, including your relationship with your children. What’s more, child custody and visitation issues can impact your relationship with your child. It is inevitable that a divorce will affect the parent-child relationship in some way. The hardest part of maintaining a parent-child relationship after divorce is getting used to the new custody and visitation arrangements. After divorce, one parent who was living in the home with the child and interacting with them on a daily basis suddenly has to live in another location, and only see their children in-person for a few days every couple of weeks, or every other weekend. When they do not see a parent often, children sometimes lose the ability to freely communicate with the noncustodial parent. It is important to remember that this is not because the child loves the noncustodial parent less, and it is not because of something the parent did wrong. Feeling less connected to the noncustodial parent is a normal feeling for children of divorce, especially for younger children. It is a priority of noncustodial parents to make the transition between each parent’s homes as smooth and comfortable as possible for the child. In order to make your child feel comfortable, it is important that you do not interrogate your child about what is going on in the other parent’s home. If you try to have your child recite a play-by-play of their week, they will not feel at...
Familiarize Yourself with Family Code

Familiarize Yourself with Family Code

Family law code is a body of statutes and case precedents that govern legal responsibilities between individuals in a family. Division eight through nine of California Family Code outlines all matters to do with child custody and child support. If you have a possible legal proceeding in your future, want to prepare yourself for a legal proceeding, or just have questions regarding specific areas of family law, family code is a database of all matters related to family law. Below is a brief summary of codes related to child custody and child support. Chapter four, section 3080-3089 describes the grounds for which joint custody can be granted. it explains that the court will determine the right of each parent with custody, including the right of the court to determine one parent as the primary caretaker. This statute also allows the court to grant joint legal custody without granting joint physical custody. Section 3100-3105 goes into detail on visitation rights. It holds that the court will grant reasonable visitation to a parent, unless it is proven that the visitation would be detrimental to the child. It states that reasonable visitation can be granted to step parents, grandparents, siblings, or others can also be granted reasonable visitation depending on the child’s situation and the child’s best interests. Section 3110-3118 goes into detail about the court’s right related to custody evaluations and reports. It describes the specific stipulations for hiring and choosing a child custody evaluator, and the rights of the evaluator and the party being evaluated. Section 3120-3121 outlines the process for an action for exclusive custody. Under this statute, each...